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Green & Healthy Schools in Illinois

July 23, 2012

What is a green school?
A green school is a building or facility that creates a healthy environment that is conducive to learning. Green schools use less energy and water, fewer resources, and are healthier and safer places for students and teachers while also decreasing operating costs through reduced utility bills.

What is the impact schools have on our community and on the environment?
20 percent of America goes to school every day – that's 55 million students and more than 5 million faculty and staff. Millions of these students and teachers attend schools that are considered substandard or dangerous to occupant health.

What is LEED for Schools?
LEED® for Schools is a national, voluntary green building certification program that promotes the design and construction of green schools and provides immediate and measurable results. Developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), LEED® for Schools is the recognized certification program that green schools across the country are using to build schools that are healthy, comfortable, cost-effective and good for the environment. LEED certification provides third party verification to parents, teachers, school boards and the community as a whole that a school building is certified green and is operating exactly the way it was intended to.

What are the benefits of LEED, particularly for schools?

  • LEED certification is a demonstration that a building project meets a nationally recognized program for sustainability, energy efficiency and quality.
  • LEED certification is a third-party validation of a building's performance. This third party verification is a requirement for all LEED projects to receive certification, to ensure that all projects are built as designed, and operate as intended.
  • Students – By addressing issues critical to student health, such as indoor air quality, daylighting, and thermal comfort, LEED® for Schools contributes to the improved health of students. A Carnegie-Mellon study found that improved indoor air quality results in a 13.5 – 87% reduction in symptoms like asthma attacks, cold, and flu.
  • Teachers and Staff – Green schools report decreased absenteeism and improved teacher and staff retention.
  • Parents – LEED is like a "nutrition label" for green, high performing schools. Parents can feel confident that their children are spending their days in schools that are healthy, safe and optimized for learning.
  • School Decision Makers and Taxpayers – Third party verification ensures that schools are operating at their highest level of performance, saving energy and water, and reducing operational budgets.
  • School administrators – Make cost-effective decisions for your school that benefit students, teachers, the community, and the environment. A school's commitment to LEED signifies that it is a part of a community that makes environmental responsibility a priority.

 

LEED 2009 for Schools Resources

LEED 2009 for Schools: New Construction and Major Renovation – Rating System; download checklist here.

LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations and Maintenance

LEED for Schools FAQ

Illinois LEED Certified Projects – K-12 and Higher Education 2011_0728

Project Profiles

Downloadable Presentations

 

Advocacy:  HJR45 Moving Towards a Sustainable Future for Illinois Schools

USGBC-Illinois Chapter Green Schools Committee

Green School References
Greening America's Schools – Gregory Kats Study

USGBC K-12 & Higher Education Resources

Build Green Schools

Playbook for Green Buildings & Neighborhoods

Center for Green Schools

National Green Schools Coalition

USGBC Green Schools Fellowship Program

Other Green Schools Resources

Green Schools Studies

 

Office of Governor Pat Quinn:

Illinois Sustainable Schools Compact

Sustainable Schools in Illinois – Schools Siting

Green Cleaning Schools Act

Third Annual Sustainable Schools Symposium – April, 2011

Regional Green Building Case Study Project

July 23, 2012

gv-fdn-logo-clr-201x45

 

Illinois Clean Energy Community Foundation The Regional Green Building Case Study Project is funded through the generous support of the Grand Victoria Foundation and the Illinois Clean Energy Community Foundation and is a collaborative, multi-year research study between the U.S. Green Building Council-Illinois Chapter, the City of Chicago, EPA Region 5, Delta Institute, and the Center for Neighborhood Technology (CNT).

 

Investing in Energy Efficiency Pays

Study Finds range in Energy Efficiency Performance and "Green Premium" Costs

Based on the success of the first year of the Regional Green Building Case Study Project and with generous support from the Grand Victoria Foundation and the Illinois Clean Energy Community Foundation, this unique research project grew to include 51 projects in 2010.  The first year report of the study was released during the fall of 2009.  The Regional Green Building Case Study: Year Two Report was just released.

An analysis of 51 LEED-certified green projects in Illinois found that most—specifically those that prioritized energy efficiency during the design and construction phase—use less energy than a typical commercial building. The study also showed that additional costs associated with green construction varied across projects, with a median value of $3.81 per square foot. In addition, building occupants are generally satisfied with their work environment and the commute to these LEED® projects.

“Not all green buildings are alike when it comes to energy efficiency,” said Anne Evens, director of the nonprofit CNT Energy, which conducted the study in partnership with the U.S. Green Building Council – Illinois Chapter (USGBC – Illinois). “Maximizing efficiency requires starting with the right priorities, monitoring usage, and tweaking operations and maintenance over the life of a building. Buildings account for a large portion of our global warming emissions here in Chicago, and building owners need to be diligent about efficiency to reduce emissions and save on utility bills.”

The study, “Regional Green Building Case Study: Year Two Report,” is a follow-up to a 2009 study that examined the energy usage and other environmental factors in 25 LEED-certified buildings in Illinois. Of the 51 buildings in this report, 19 also participated in 2009. To receive LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification, the U.S. Green Building Council rates green building projects on a point system for features that improve energy efficiency, indoor air quality, water use, and other areas. CNT Energy analyzed how projects performed over multiple years in areas including energy and water use, greenhouse gas emissions, operating costs, commute transportation and occupant comfort.

The participating green building projects include offices, museums, police stations and other building use types. The study’s sample represents nearly 25 percent of the state’s LEED-certified projects and includes projects from throughout the Chicago metropolitan area and central Illinois. The projects vary in size from 971 square feet to 4.2 million square feet. All provided at least 12 months of post-occupancy energy utility data. Most were able to provide energy use information for entire buildings, while 16 were able to provide only partial information about energy usage.

According to the U.S. Energy Information Agency, the average energy use intensity (EUI) for commercial buildings in the Midwest is 99 kilo-Btu per square feet per year (kBtu/ft2/year). Sixty-four percent of the LEED projects that provided energy use data for the entire building used less energy than this average for commercial buildings. Likewise, 77 percent of projects that provided partial energy use data performed better than a similar benchmark.

Twenty three participants provided information on a “green premium,” which is the difference between a project’s actual construction costs and the expected costs had the project been completed without green features. Two projects reported no green premium, while the others reported premiums ranging from less than $1 per square foot to $107 per square foot. Most projects noted that grants or other financial incentives helped to offset the green premium.

Of the 19 study participants that provided information on operating costs, 11 indicated that their costs were lower than before moving into a green building, five noted no change in costs, two reported that they were not tracking such information, and one reported that costs had increased.

“Sustainability efforts should not stop after the design and construction phase,” said Doug Widener, executive director of USGBC – Illinois. “Achieving ideal performance for green buildings requires understanding how the building performs in the first place and continuously monitoring how it performs over time.”

The USGBC – Illinois Chapter will be presenting these findings, along with other other contributors, at Greenbuild in Toronto on October 6, 2011.

 

Click here to view the Final Report for the Regional Green Building Case Study: Year Two Report.

Click here to view the Executive Summary for the Regional Green Building Case Study Project (Year 1).

Click here to view the Final Report for Regional Green Building Case Study Project (Year 1).


Several organizations and individuals contributed to the success of this project.  Please accept our gratitude for helping to make this project possible:

 

Project Supporters:

GV Fdn logo CLRsm

Illinois Clean Energy
Community Foundation

 

 

Project Partners:

usgbcil_logo_black U.S. Green Building Council-Illinois Chapter cntsm Center for Neighborhood Technology
EPA Seal U.S. EPA, Region 5 DeltaLogoType_Outlines Delta Insitute
city-of-chicago-seal City of Chicago, Department of Environment & Department of Zoning Land Use Planning

 

 

Steering Committee

Michael Berkshire, City of Chicago

Chris Choi, U.S. EPA, Region 5

Abby Corso, Delta Institute

Kathryn Eggers, CNT Energy

Helen Kessler, HJKessler Associates, Inc.

Bob Newport, U.S. EPA, Region 5

HJennifer Wang, Kindy Kruller, Elise Zelechowski, and Kevin Dick,
Delta Institute

Doug Widener, U.S. Green Building Council – Illinois Chapter

 

Authors

Kathryn Eggers, CNT Energy

Doug Widener, U.S. Green Building Council-Illinois Chapter

 

 

 

Contributors

Sophia Becker

Dan Cohen

Kathy Devine

Megan Hubel

Seth Johnson

Helen Kessler

Mike Orr

Alan Saposnik

Mike Vendiola

Lois Vitt Sale

Linda Young

 

Green & Healthy Homes and Communities

July 24, 2012

LEED for HomesLEED For Homes

Designed for new homes and major renovations, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) for Homes is a voluntary rating system that promotes the design and construction of high-performance green homes. It is applicable to many home types including affordable housing, mass-production homes, custom designs, stand-alone single-family homes, duplexes and townhouses, suburban low-rise apartments, urban high-rise apartments and condominiums and lofts in historic buildings.   more>>

New! Download a one-page snapshot summary of the LEED for Homes rating system.

Certified LEED Homes in Illinois

Click images to view Project Profiles for LEED Certified homes, courtesy of AES.
LEED Silver - Bloomingdale, IL

LEED Silver single-family
Peluso Residence
Bloomingdale, IL
Project Profile

LEED Gold - Highland Park, IL

LEED Gold multi-family
Hyacinth Place
Highland Park, IL
Project Profile

LEED Platinum - Chicago, IL

LEED Platinum single-family
Yannell Residence
Chicago, IL
Project Profile

LEED Platinum gut rehab - Chicago, IL

LEED Platinum single-family gut-rehab
Helenowski Residence
Chicago, IL
Project Profile

Why live in a LEED home?  The video below explains the benefits.

 

Other Rating Systems

More than 70 local or regional green home building programs exist in the United States. Each of these programs is unique, with its own specifications and requirements. Please note that these guidelines may not require documentation and independent, third-party verification. These programs are neither endorsed by nor affiliated with the USGBC and are provided for informational purposes only.

 

Resources

Illinois Energy Code
On January 29, 2010, the state of Illinois has adopted the 2009 version of the International Energy Conservation Code, IECC 2009, which is applicable to most municipalities except those with over 1 million residents (i.e. Chicago).  This code is the first statewide energy code, or remodeling code, ever adopted. It requires builders, remodelers, and architects to be well-versed in building science. The code goes above IECC 2003, the current baseline for an ENERGY STAR or LEED-certified home. This will result in many new homes meeting the requirements for ENERGY STAR certification, the first step towards LEED certification. Learn more about IECC 2009 at iccsafe.org or view a comparison of LEED vs IECC 2009.

The Green Home Guide
The USGBC's Green Home Guide website includes resources for finding green architects and builders, what makes a home green, green home programs, living green, REGREEN remodeling guidelines, and news and events. more>>

REGREEN
ASID and USGBC partnered to develop best practice guidelines and targeted educational resources for sustainable residential improvement projects. This resource also includes a green product checklist and case studies. more>>

Healthy House Institute
The Healthy House Institute (HHI) provides consumers information to make their homes healthier. HHI strives to be the most comprehensive educational resource available for creating healthier homes.  more>>

Frequently Asked Questions for Home Builders
Frequently Asked Questions for Home Buyers

USGBC-Illinois Chapter Residential Green Building Committee

LEED for Homes news and developments in Illinois

Central Illinois Branch

July 11, 2012

Education and Research Committee

July 18, 2012

The Education & Research Committee plans and implements a variety of green building educational programs including LEED Extra Credit, Green Building Nuts & Bolts for Contractors, and regional green building case studies.

Committee Chairs

Helen Kessler, HJKessler Associates (Board Liaison)

Jason Westrope, DMA Associates

Past Committee Chairs

Ava Kuo, 2002 (Founding Chair)
Elaine Lockwood Bean. 2003-2004
Lynn Hollenberg, 2005-2006
Jessica Mondo, 2007
George Tuhowski, 2007-2008

Committee Members

Larry Alport

Annie Balonick, LPK International

Jenny Carney, YRG Sustainability

Samantha Duba, Eckenhoff Saunders Architects

Kathryn Eggers, CNT

Larry Eiben, K&L Gates LLP

David Eldridge, Grumman Butkus

Tom Holzheimer, Gilbane Building Co

Neil Leslie, Gas Technology Institute (Chair, Research)

Ephi Maglaris, Real Energy Sustainability

Meghann Maves, Recyling Services (Chair, Chicago Branch)

Jeff Pekarek

Ron Phillips, Willis

Stephenie Presseller, Moraine Valley Community College (Chair, South Suburban Education Committee)

Rick Prohov, Prohov & Associates

Christine Smyrski, LEED Council Green Leeders

Christian Swiencki, The Office Connection (Co-chair, Chicago Branch Education Committee)

George Tuhowski, Leopardo Companies

George Vavaroutsos, Malachite LLC (Chair, CRE)

Sharon Waller, Sustainable Systems


Committee Meeting Schedule

Residential Green Building

July 18, 2012

LEED for Homes

LEED For Homes

Designed for new homes and major renovations, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) for Homes is a voluntary rating system that promotes the design and construction of high-performance green homes. It is applicable to many home types including affordable housing, mass-production homes, custom designs, stand-alone single-family homes, duplexes and townhouses, suburban low-rise apartments, urban high-rise apartments and condominiums and lofts in historic buildings. more>>

New! Download a one-page snapshot summary of the LEED for Homes rating system.

Certified LEED Homes in Illinois

Click images to view Project Profiles for LEED Certified homes, courtesy of AES.
LEED Silver - Bloomingdale, IL

LEED Silver single-family
Peluso Residence
Bloomingdale, IL
Project Profile

LEED Gold - Highland Park, IL

LEED Gold multi-family
Hyacinth Place
Highland Park, IL
Project Profile

LEED Platinum - Chicago, IL

LEED Platinum single-family
Yannell Residence
Chicago, IL
Project Profile

LEED Platinum gut rehab - Chicago, IL

LEED Platinum single-family gut-rehab
Helenowski Residence
Chicago, IL
Project Profile

Why live in a LEED home? The video below explains the benefits.


Other Rating Systems

More than 70 local or regional green home building programs exist in the United States. Each of these programs is unique, with its own specifications and requirements. Please note that these guidelines may not require documentation and independent, third-party verification. These programs are neither endorsed by nor affiliated with the USGBC and are provided for informational purposes only.


Resources

Illinois Energy Code
On January 29, 2010, the state of Illinois has adopted the 2009 version of the International Energy Conservation Code, IECC 2009, which is applicable to most municipalities except those with over 1 million residents (i.e. Chicago). This code is the first statewide energy code, or remodeling code, ever adopted. It requires builders, remodelers, and architects to be well-versed in building science. The code goes above IECC 2003, the current baseline for an ENERGY STAR or LEED-certified home. This will result in many new homes meeting the requirements for ENERGY STAR certification, the first step towards LEED certification. Learn more about IECC 2009 at iccsafe.org or view a comparison of LEED vs IECC 2009.

The Green Home Guide
The USGBC’s Green Home Guide website includes resources for finding green architects and builders, what makes a home green, green home programs, living green, REGREEN remodeling guidelines, and news and events. more>>

REGREEN
ASID and USGBC partnered to develop best practice guidelines and targeted educational resources for sustainable residential improvement projects. This resource also includes a green product checklist and case studies. more>>

Healthy House Institute
The Healthy House Institute (HHI) provides consumers information to make their homes healthier. HHI strives to be the most comprehensive educational resource available for creating healthier homes. more>>

Frequently Asked Questions for Home Builders
Frequently Asked Questions for Home Buyers

USGBC-Illinois Chapter Residential Green Building Committee

LEED for Homes news and developments in Illinois

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July 4, 2012

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